Just Do It Already! (aka: Workout Time)

exercise

 

Okay, everyone — grab your sneakers, pull on your leg warmers, get your water bottle ready. It’s time to workout!

No way, many of you will say. I’m too tired to workout. My schedule is too busy to fit in exercise. I’m not in the mood to workout.  I can’t afford to join a health club. My back/knees/hips are too bad to exercise. I’ll start my exercise program sometime down the line, but not now.

Never now.

It is astounding to me to hear the many excuses that people scrounge up when trying to avoid exercise. It is as though moving their bodies is as dreadful a chore as organizing the garage. Now in some rare circumstances, I can understand why exercise must be put on hold. If your doctor gives you a red light for health reasons, for example. As for the other excuses?

I’m too tired. You’re in luck! Science tells us that exercise gives you a natural energy boost. When you do a moderate workout, your mitochondria kick into high gear, pumping out more energy for your body to use.

My schedule is too busy. As a single mom of three busy kids who holds down a full time job, and, until a few months ago, was also a full-time student, I know all about busy schedules. But I’ve also learned how to prioritize important things, like my health. On those days when I just can’t squeeze 30 minutes at the gym into my schedule, I break up the exercise by taking 10-15 minute walks during my breaks. One of my favorite quick workouts on busy days? Climbing the many stairs in the building where I work. On purpose.

 

Every workout counts

 

I’m not in the mood. Good news — did you know that regular exercise can ease depression and anxiety and generally improve your mood? It can also help you to sleep better, take your mind off worries, and help you to cope with stress in a healthy way.

I can’t afford a health club membership. It is true that gym memberships can be costly. On the other hand, so can health care costs associated with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other ailments than can often be avoided or alleviated by a healthy diet and regular exercise. If a gym membership really can’t be worked into the budget, however, consider some free to low-cost forms of exercise, such as daily walking, bike riding around town, gardening, or at-home aerobic exercises with a video.

 

personal trainer

 

My back/knees/hips are too bad to exercise. These can be legitimate reasons to avoid high-impact workouts, like running, for example. Even my own chronic health issue, cholinergic urticaria, used to be an exercise-stopper before it was treated. But having physical ailments doesn’t have to exclude you from all forms of daily exercise. Many people with bad backs or joint pain have discovered that there are forms of exercise that can benefit them, too. Try low-impact aerobics classes, yoga, or swimming. The strength you gain and the weight you may lose may also help to alleviate discomfort.

I’ll start my exercise program sometime down the line… If not now, then when? You don’t need a New Year’s Resolution or a medical crisis to be your starting point. Nor do you need to start big, by trying to tackle some big exercise program at once. Start your change with small baby steps. Pull in a friend, partner, or coworker for social motivation. Turn that zero minutes a day into ten minutes, then fifteen minutes, until you eventually can follow the Department of Health and Human Services’ guidelines of at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise, each week. That’s around 20 minutes per day.

 

no workout regrets

 

Not sure where to start? The web is packed with great workout ideas, both moderate and vigorous. If you belong to a health club, consider hiring a personal trainer to design a personalized workout just for you, and to coach you through your routine. If going solo is going nowhere, consider group fitness classes or adult sport leagues. If you hate running, don’t run! Not a swimmer? Try cycling. My current favorites, by the way, are Zumba, tennis, and 20-minute walk/runs. Don’t be afraid to try something new, and switch it up when the workout gets old. Now let’s get in shape!

 

 

Move It Move It (aka: The Fitness Discussion Again)

If you are reading this right now, then chances are you have some sort of New Year’s Resolution in mind.

Yes, you, readers. All five of you.

It may be something subtle, like, “Eh, I probably shouldn’t eat so much fast food this year.” Or some more ambitious goal, like, “This year, I shall lose fifty pounds!”

Um, good luck with that.

According to Nielsen, the two most popular New Year’s Resolutions year after year pertain to weight loss and fitness: losing weight, keeping it off, and getting physically fit. It’s almost as though we actually recognize that our bodies aren’t meant to lie around on the couch as we feed them Cheetos and root beer (ew).

good health New Year

So how do we achieve these goals? Do we switch to one of those all-meat-no-bread or all-bread-no-meat diets? Invest a few hundred dollars in a membership at that fancy health club with all the high-tech workout equipment? Buy a FitBit? Pin up inspirational magazine pics of fit, skinny people around our work cubicles?

Well you can, if that’s your thing. But here are two things that will probably work a whole lot better:

  1. Consume fewer daily calories (No way!)
  2. Move your body a lot more (*Gasp!*)

I know, I know. These two things are like, physically impossible. But know what? They work for a lot of us. Now, you can join a fancy gym if that’s what works for you, and you can afford it. But really, there are a lot of activities you can try which will help you in your journey, whether your goal is weight loss or maintenance, physical fitness, or just overall enjoyment of life. Here are a few ideas:

Health club/Gym (This means actually going several times a week and like, using the equipment)

Yoga / Zumba / Pilates / Cardio Kickboxing class

Adult sports leagues: Soccer, basketball, volleyball, softball (Especially soccer. Try that one first)

Frisbee

Tennis (try looking for a local meetup group if you need a partner)

Hiking

Dancing (classes or casually)

Roller skating / ice skating / inline skating

Running (Try Couch to 5K ® if you’re not sure where to begin)

Swimming / water aerobics

Paddleboarding / kayaking / rowing

Cross-fit (Some people love the group experience and varied routines)

Cycling (You don’t need an expensive, fancy bike to enjoy biking, and it’s great local transportation, too)

running sports fitness

Just remember: What works for one person may not work for another. I, for example, wouldn’t play basketball if you paid me. But I am crazy about soccer, Frisbee, and tennis. Also, don’t be too quick to decide that a physical activity is not right for you. I was once adamant that my body was not built for running. But I made a commitment to try it for six months, and guess what? I ended up with a body that was built for running. Go figure! At the end of the day, it’s all about which type of exercise will motivate you to get up and move on a regular basis. Every little bit that you do is a step toward achieving your health and fitness goals.

Weight Loss is a Piece of (Low-Calorie) Cake. Plus Exercise.

Healthy weight lossWeight loss is not that hard. Okay, well, if you already have the body of an almost-anorexic fashion model, and you are trying to lose ten more pounds, that is probably hard. But most Americans – especially we women, do not have the bodies of fashion models. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of overweight adults in this country (determined by a Body Mass Index, or BMI of 25 or greater) is 69.2%, and the percentage of those considered obese (A BMI of 30 or greater) is 35.9%.

We have so many excuses for our unhealthy weight. I have big bones. I inherited a slow metabolism. Many people have simply given up on weight loss and chosen to embrace their excess weight. Now, I am not saying that this is a bad thing. If a person is in good health, does not suffer from weight-related health issues, and has a positive self-image, then that is a wonderful thing and should be commended. But for those who are unhappy with their figures, who complain about problems with their aching joints or bad backs, or who have weight-related health concerns, then here is my question: why haven’t you lost the weight?

I come from a family with many overweight and obese people (not very unusual for Black American families). And I, at one time, was also quite overweight. At my highest non-pregnant weight, my BMI was 29.9 – teetering dangerously on the edge of obesity. I, too, had excuses. Children. Lack of time for the gym. Genes. I refused to go jogging, because I was certain that my top-heavy body was not built for it. But it was not until I decided that it was important enough that I really began to shed pounds. And you know what? It really was not that hard to do. Sure, it took discipline, but can you name one good accomplishment in life that does not take discipline? Eventually, after two years of lifestyle changes, I lost 70 pounds. And now, around four years after I began the journey, I have still managed to keep my weight in a healthy, normal BMI range. I am no super hero. I do not have an eating disorder. I just try my best to make regular healthy decisions about food and exercise. Almost anyone can do it successfully, and here’s how:

  1. KNOW YOUR CALORIES

Calories count. Eat more calories than you burn off, and you will gain weight. Eat fewer than you burn off, and you will lose weight. It is really that simple. It does not matter if those calories come from carbs or protein. Eat whatever the hell makes your taste buds happy and leaves you healthy and satisfied. But make it a point to know how many calories are in each food that you eat. Stuffed yourself with a huge, 700-calorie breakfast? Balance it with a lower calorie lunch and dinner. My goal is to keep my daily caloric intake somewhere between 1,200 to 1,500. Most days I do just fine. Every now and then, I go crazy and eat a dozen homemade cookies. And that’s okay.

My favorite source for calorie tracking? http://caloriecount.about.com/ It is free, easy to use, and has a great app for mobile calorie counting.

healthy weight success

  1. MOVE YOUR BODY

It is not all about the diet sodas and low-cal salad dressing. It is not all about the smaller serving sizes. Unless you plan to starve yourself, it is pretty much impossible to maintain a healthy body weight without exercise. Oh, I know, I know. Your knees hurt. Your back hurts. You’re not built for running. You have cholinergic urticaria. Oh wait – these were my excuses, remember? Unless you are a paraplegic, you can exercise. Don’t like running? Then walk for an hour every day. Swim. Do yoga. Try a Zumba class. Ride your bike to the store. Play a sport in an adult league. Jump rope. It really doesn’t matter, as long as you do it regularly. Aim for no less than 3 times per week. And do not “reward” your hard work with treats.

  1. MEET YOUR OTHER NEEDS

Many people tend to overeat or skip exercise due to some other need not being met. Give your body and spirit what it needs to maintain balance. Get enough sleep. Find healthy outlets to help you manage your stress. Stay busy with work, playing with your kids, cleaning house, or volunteering in your community. When your other physical and emotional needs are met, then you may find yourself naturally eating less food and moving your body more.

  1. MAKE IT SOCIAL

I realize that not everyone in the world lives in social isolation like me. Lots of people have more success meeting their personal goals with the encouragement of a partner or group. If that is you, then give it a try. Sign up for a local Weight Watchers group. Join a group aerobics class. Go walking or jogging with a partner. Chime in on a weight-loss forum. Many people who have successfully lost weight and kept it off have done it with the support and motivation of like-minded peers.

That’s it. Four tips. Four easy steps to consider when you are finally ready to make the change to a healthier way of living. Notice – I did not say “go on a diet.” A diet is temporary. But true healthy weight management is the result of permanent changes to your lifestyle that result in a healthier (and smaller) you.

Losing pounds