Just Do It Already! (aka: Workout Time)

exercise

 

Okay, everyone — grab your sneakers, pull on your leg warmers, get your water bottle ready. It’s time to workout!

No way, many of you will say. I’m too tired to workout. My schedule is too busy to fit in exercise. I’m not in the mood to workout.  I can’t afford to join a health club. My back/knees/hips are too bad to exercise. I’ll start my exercise program sometime down the line, but not now.

Never now.

It is astounding to me to hear the many excuses that people scrounge up when trying to avoid exercise. It is as though moving their bodies is as dreadful a chore as organizing the garage. Now in some rare circumstances, I can understand why exercise must be put on hold. If your doctor gives you a red light for health reasons, for example. As for the other excuses?

I’m too tired. You’re in luck! Science tells us that exercise gives you a natural energy boost. When you do a moderate workout, your mitochondria kick into high gear, pumping out more energy for your body to use.

My schedule is too busy. As a single mom of three busy kids who holds down a full time job, and, until a few months ago, was also a full-time student, I know all about busy schedules. But I’ve also learned how to prioritize important things, like my health. On those days when I just can’t squeeze 30 minutes at the gym into my schedule, I break up the exercise by taking 10-15 minute walks during my breaks. One of my favorite quick workouts on busy days? Climbing the many stairs in the building where I work. On purpose.

 

Every workout counts

 

I’m not in the mood. Good news — did you know that regular exercise can ease depression and anxiety and generally improve your mood? It can also help you to sleep better, take your mind off worries, and help you to cope with stress in a healthy way.

I can’t afford a health club membership. It is true that gym memberships can be costly. On the other hand, so can health care costs associated with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other ailments than can often be avoided or alleviated by a healthy diet and regular exercise. If a gym membership really can’t be worked into the budget, however, consider some free to low-cost forms of exercise, such as daily walking, bike riding around town, gardening, or at-home aerobic exercises with a video.

 

personal trainer

 

My back/knees/hips are too bad to exercise. These can be legitimate reasons to avoid high-impact workouts, like running, for example. Even my own chronic health issue, cholinergic urticaria, used to be an exercise-stopper before it was treated. But having physical ailments doesn’t have to exclude you from all forms of daily exercise. Many people with bad backs or joint pain have discovered that there are forms of exercise that can benefit them, too. Try low-impact aerobics classes, yoga, or swimming. The strength you gain and the weight you may lose may also help to alleviate discomfort.

I’ll start my exercise program sometime down the line… If not now, then when? You don’t need a New Year’s Resolution or a medical crisis to be your starting point. Nor do you need to start big, by trying to tackle some big exercise program at once. Start your change with small baby steps. Pull in a friend, partner, or coworker for social motivation. Turn that zero minutes a day into ten minutes, then fifteen minutes, until you eventually can follow the Department of Health and Human Services’ guidelines of at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise, each week. That’s around 20 minutes per day.

 

no workout regrets

 

Not sure where to start? The web is packed with great workout ideas, both moderate and vigorous. If you belong to a health club, consider hiring a personal trainer to design a personalized workout just for you, and to coach you through your routine. If going solo is going nowhere, consider group fitness classes or adult sport leagues. If you hate running, don’t run! Not a swimmer? Try cycling. My current favorites, by the way, are Zumba, tennis, and 20-minute walk/runs. Don’t be afraid to try something new, and switch it up when the workout gets old. Now let’s get in shape!

 

 

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Girl on Fire (aka Allergic to Exercise)

Run interrupted It happened again this morning. Like I do so often, I pulled on my sneakers and went for a run. It started out beautifully – cool, sunny weather, an empty park, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers blasting through my earbuds. But less than ten minutes later, it all went wrong.

First, a flush of warmth spread throughout my midsection. Within seconds, this turned into a hot flush, and my skin began to itch. As I continued to jog around the park, the sensation intensified, until I was overwhelmed with discomfort. It felt as though my body was on fire, yet excruciatingly itchy at the same time. (Cue Music: Girl on Fire – Alicia Keys).

Girl on fire

By the time I made it back to my car, I was in tears, covered with hives, feeling as though I was being attacked by a swarm of flaming mosquitoes. I sank into the driver’s seat and sat there, unmoving, for several minutes, until the symptoms gradually subsided and I could relax.

I know what you are wondering. What the heck happened during that run? Obviously, that was not normal. Well, it is something that began when I was in my early twenties. When the weird symptoms first began, I described them to my doctor. “Huh,” he said. “That’s weird.”

Gee. Thanks, doc.

Over time, I sought the opinions of three more physicians, including a dermatologist. One doctor even sent me to the hospital for a treadmill test in order to induce the reaction. No one had any idea how to diagnose me. No one had any recommendations for treatment, other than Benadryl and avoidance of exercise. Since Benadryl made me feel like I was swimming in syrup throughout the day, I began to avoid exercise. This was so hard to do! I was so athletic. I have always loved to play sports, ride my bike, and dance around my living room. Suddenly, I was forced to do nothing more than occasional slow walks around the block. Medical Mystery

And then, thanks to the amazing powers of Google, I began to come across accounts of other people suffering from similar symptoms. And behold! Suddenly my weird condition had a name: Cholinergic Urticaria. An allergic reaction to exercise. Seriously. Apparently, whenever my body core begins to heat up, I suffer a hypersensitive response that does not stop until I stop moving. For some people, this response can even lead to anaphylactic shock. Luckily, I have never experienced that reaction. And luckily, I finally found a doctor who was familiar with the problem and directed me toward THE wonder drug for people with cholinergic urticaria: Zyrtec. Hooray for Zyrtec! God bless the makers of Zyrtec!

No one knows for sure what causes cholinergic urticaria. Doctors and medical researchers have various theories – genetics, environment, food allergies, auto-immune reactions. No one knows exactly how to treat it, either, since not everyone responds well to antihistamines or steroids. “Avoid activities that may lead to a reaction,” the medical community recommends. In other words, avoid sports, avoid hot showers, avoid sex, and avoid exercise of any kind, especially in cold weather. Ha! Thankfully, I do respond well to antihistamines, and so long as I take my wonder pill every day, I do not have to limit my exercise. I can run, play soccer, and ride my bike as much as I want. But if I slip up and do not take my pill (like today), then the consequences are severe.

Many sufferers of cholinergic urticaria are told to avoid exercise

Many sufferers of cholinergic urticaria are told to avoid exercise

Well, now that I once again have Zyrtec coursing through my veins, battling histamines like a well-trained army, I can now move once again. Perhaps I will go and finish that run, or turn up the Red Hot Chili Peppers and dance around my living room.

Additional Reading on Cholinergic Urticaria:

http://www.cigna.com/individualandfamilies/health-and-well-being/hw/medical-topics/urticaria-cholinergic-nord249.html

http://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/1015/p1367.html

http://www.cholinergicurticaria.net/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20086478

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6169753

http://running.about.com/od/illnessesandrunning/ss/embarrassing_6.htm